Clinical Complexities in
Supplementing Babies

32 CERPs + CEUs

Enrollment closed

Because fed is just the beginning.

Online infant feeding and human lactation conference.

All recordings available through 4/30/23

32 CERPs/CEUs

Enrollment closed.

The families we’re seeing have complicated needs.

They need a lactation consultant who is more than a cheerleader for exclusive breastfeeding–whatever that even means.

To meet their needs, you need to know all the things.

Bottles. Pumps. At breast supplementers. Chestfeeding. Nursing Aversion. Formula. Fortifiers. Dysphagia. Gut Health. Co-Nursing. The WHO Code.

These words shouldn’t be scary, but if you don’t have skills in these areas, you’re constantly going to come up short.

And when that happens, families walk away feeling unheard, unsupported, and unvalidated.

Most importantly, they don’t meet their feeding goals.

Inside Clinical Complexities in Supplementing Babies, you’ll get comprehensive training to become the kind of lactation consultant who can truly help everyone who comes your way.

Empty slogans don’t help anyone.

Skilled, compassionate, inclusive, collaborative, and goal centered care makes all the difference in the world.

Are you ready to do more than just “check the latch?”

When faced with the decision of where to spend my continuing education dollars, I could not have chosen better. Annie Frisbie’s Clinical Complexities in Private Practice (Fall, 2021) was a comprehensive and well-organized virtual conference. She has curated knowledgable, passionate, and diverse speakers in the field of lactation. I learned skills I didn’t even know I was lacking in. I can’t wait for the next Clinical Complexities conference!

Annmarie Hext, IBCLC

Enrollment closed

I feel like I was chatting with experienced colleagues and learned so much.

Rachel Supercinski, IBCLC

Scholarships may be available for those identifying as  LGBTQ+ or BIPOC and/or who are residing and practicing in countries designated by the World Bank as Category B, C, or D.

20 Trainings by Expert Instructors

Plus the exclusive bonuses – 1.5 additional cerps!

  • BONUS 1: Instant Access to Turn Up the Volume: Managing Supplementation (1.5 L-CERPs + 1.5 CEUs) taught by Rebecca Costello MPH, IBCLC

  • BONUS 2: Pumping is Breastfeeding (1.5 L-CERPs/CEUs) taught by Nichelle Clark, IBCLC

  • BONUS 3: Exclusive resources developed by the instructors so you can implement what you’re learning with families right away.

  • BONUS 4: Self study and implementation call in July

  • BONUS 5: Private podcast feed for listening on your favorite app

That’s 32 CERPs/CEUs!

Enrollment closed

I am grateful to Annie and all the other presenters for giving me the tools and confidence to practice better.

Alicia D. Farina, BA, RN, IBCLC

Explore The Sessions

An Added Layer of Safety and Preserving Lactation: When Supplementation Happens During an Emergency

🎉 Bonus! Reducing Infant Supplementation Risks in Emergencies and Disasters (will be made available in Spanish and English)

0.5 E-CERPs + 0.5 L-CERPs + 1.5 CEUs

Instructor: Lourdes M. Santaballa Mora MS IBCLC CLAAS IYCFS

Abstract: Infant and young child feeding during emergencies is a specific field of lactation that focuses on the preservation of lactation and reducing risk to combination fed or non-breastfed infants. Climate change, human infrastructure failure and ongoing global unrest and migration may be increasing the need to acquire this type of intervention and skill set. Supplementation skills used outside of disaster contexts may be relevant but require a specific knowledge of trauma informed care, low skill tools that can be used on the ground in the absence of supplies, utilities and technology, and adaptation of the methods used to the type of disaster.  Applying the skills that we use during times of stability but adapting them to emergency response, we will discuss what a disaster or emergency is, how lactation is threatened during the aftermath of the crisis, and the methods of supplementation that can be applied specifically to families in disaster contexts.

🏆 “I have been doing on the ground IYCF-E work post Irma and Maria, post earthquake and during the COVID-19 pandemic. I probably helped more families relactate and supplement in the six month period after the hurricanes than I had in the six years of being an IBCLC before the disasters.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A6 Milk banking – formal and informal
I. A7 Normal infant behaviors
II. 8 Relactation
III. A7 Infant acute disease (bacterial, viral, fungal)
III. B3 Maternal acute disease (bacterial, viral, fungal) 
III. B7 Milk supply, low or over
V. 6 Identifying support networks
V. 9 Mother-baby relationship
VI. 4 Managing supply
VII. A1 Feeding devices (e.g. tubes at breast, cups, syringes, teats)
VII. A2 Handling and storage of human milk
VII. A3 Nipple devices (e.g. shields, everters) 
VII. A4 Pacifiers
VII. A5 Pumps
VII. C5 WHO code – advocacy and policy

Addressing underlying infant developmental milestones to improve milk transfer

🎉 Bonus! When to refer to an occupational therapist

1 R-CERP/1 CEU

Instructor: Dr. Christine L. Kan, OTD, OTR/L, IBCLC

Abstract: As lactation professionals, we miss the importance of head and neck control and how it impacts breastfeeding. Breastfeeding through a neurodevelopmental perspective emphasizes the importance of stabilizing the base (trunk and head control) to have better functional movements (feeding, interacting, breastfeeding). Consequently, babies should be meeting their developmental milestones to transfer milk effectively. Disruptions in head or trunk control will directly impact orofacial sensory motor function and milk transfer. Tummy time is an effective and practical way for parents to work on at home to improve head and trunk control. In this webinar, you will learn the importance of head and control, how it impacts orofacial sensory motor function, and how to screen for developmental concerns.

🏆 “Developmental milestones are the bread and butter of a pediatric occupational therapist, and my skills as a feeding specialist, an IBCLC, and working in the NICU can help tie how head and neck control relate and impact breastfeeding”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A1 Feeding behaviours at different ages
I. A3 Infant anatomy and anatomical/oral challenges
I. A10 Skin tone, muscle tone, reflexes

Bon appe-teat! Strategies for managing nutrition during the first year of life

🎉 Bonus! Hypoallergenic formula cheat sheet

1.5 CERPs + 1.5 CEUs

Instructor: Hope Lima PhD, RDN, IBCLC

Abstract: When families are unable to exclusively breastfeed, supplementation with formula may be medically necessary. While any infant formula can meet the minimum nutritional standards for an infant, it is important for IBCLCs to be able to guide the families that they work with on choosing an appropriate infant formula to use for supplementation. Considerations when counseling families on formula supplementation include current infant nutritional status and health history, infant nutritional needs, and infant sensitivities or allergies. This presentation will provide the necessary information for screening infant nutritional status, choosing an appropriate formula for supplementation, and adjustments families can make once complementary foods are introduced.

🏆 “EI am a registered dietitian and IBCLC – so my area of specialty is in infant nutrition. Beyond just supporting families who are breast/chestfeeding, I work with families whose babies need supplementation for complex reasons (metabolic disorders, G-tube, etc.).”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A1. Feeding behaviours at different ages
I. A2. Food intolerances/allergies
I. A4. Introducing complementary foods
I. A8. Nutritional requirements – preterm

Bottle Feeding Skills for the Breastfed Infant

🎉 Bonus! Bottle Skills for the IBCLC- A Fresh Perspective

1 L-CERP + 1 CEU

Instructor: Susan Howard MSN, RN, IBCLC

Abstract: Bottle feeding is the preferred method of providing expressed human milk to an infant during times of parental separation. Reasons for parent/infant separation in the United States include returning to work, separation due to infant or material medical complications, travel for business or pleasure purposes, and parental socialization. Additionally, it is common that exclusively breastfeeding parents choose to use a pump to provide human milk to their infant with a bottle rather than feed directly at the breast for any number of reasons. Due to the commonality of bottle feeding expressed human milk, it is the duty of the lactation consultant to have the appropriate skills for supporting bottle feeding families and for improving infant bottle-feeding skills when they are not going well. In this presentation, practical skills for supporting bottle feeding families as well as technical skills for improving an infant’s ability to feed at the bottle will be discussed.

🏆 “I think of myself as the accidental bottle expert. Years ago, parents started asking for help with their bottle refusing baby at my breastfeeding support group.  I shared the ‘typical’ strategies for bottle skills, but they didn’t seem very effective. Most of the strategies relied on distractions and pressure feeding rather than actually teaching babies to recognized, accept, suck and swallow from a bottle. I started to develop a more respectful, intuitive approach to bottle skills and have found that my techniques are very effective.  I’ve worked with hundreds of bottle refusing babies, developed a Bottle Boot Camp, and shared my strategies with colleagues across many disciplines. Bottle skills is a niche area in the feeding world and I’m thrilled to sit in this small corner and share my expertise.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
VI. 7 – Refusal of breast, bottle
VII. A1 – Feeding devices
VII. B5 – Educating mothers and families

Care plans for Supplementing Families: How to use Motivational Interviewing to create feasible, sustainable plans and goals

🎉 Bonus! The Readiness and Confidence Ruler

1 R-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Johanna Sargeant, BA, BEd, IBCLC

Abstract: Lactation consultants often accompany new parents as they make difficult decisions, and those involving supplementation can hold many layers of emotional and practical complexity. We need to ensure the baby is fed, protect the parent’s mental and physical health, and ensure we hold a deep awareness of the power of our words throughout such conversations. It is clear, however, that much of the feedback from families has been that their lactation consultant has failed to provide adequate, individualised, sensitive support during such conversations. The deep desire to ‘help’ a family or to ‘fix’ their situation by giving evidence-based information alongside clear advice and prescripted plans can actually significantly reduce positive outcomes, further isolating them emotionally and increasing their risk of harm. Instead of wanting to fix, we must enter each consultation with a deep curiosity about these people before us, and learn ways to mobilise them towards their own goal in ways that are feasible, sustainable and deeply emotionally aware. Learners will explore some specific Motivational Interviewing strategies that they can immediately apply in consultations so that parents feel wholly supported, motivated towards any necessary changes, feel ownership of their plan, and to ultimately increase the likelihood of their own sense of success.

🏆 “I have seen the power of these techniques! I now use these skills in every single consult, and clearly see the difference for my clients — and for myself too, feeling a deep confidence in my abilities to provide powerful support that encourages autonomy.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
VII. B1 Active Listening
VII. B2 Anticipatory Guidance
VII. B3 Care Plan Development and Sharing
VII. B4 Documentation
VII. B5 Educating Mothers and Families

The Elephant Often Ignored: Bias & Politics of Artificial Infant Supplementation

🎉 Bonus! Decision tree to prevent bias in supplementation recommendations

1 E-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Sekeita Lewis-Johnson, DNP FNP-BC IBCLC

Abstract: The risks of formula supplementation are well known. The mantra “Breast is Best” has been a resounding cry since the late 19th century when infants were notably dying from diarrhea. Human milk feeding is an infant rights issue because it saves lives and provide optimal nutrition for best life span health outcomes. The rise of the global Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative has demonstrated that best practices that support human milk feeding improve health outcomes. However, non-compliant best practice may contribute to human milk diet inequities which can be classified as food oppression. Many studies have attempted to address human milk barriers and racial disparities based on the lactating individual’s family, culture, and environment. Many healthcare workers strive to mitigate the effects of artificial feeding. However, actionable and measurable behaviors of bias, discrimination, and politics of non-medically indicated artificial infant supplementation is left out of major conversations of reconciliation of inequities. In this presentation, you will learn about the latest evidence regarding bias, discrimination and politics of artificial human milk substitutes. You will also learn about current research that demonstrates how bias and politics influence and undermine exclusive human milk diets as often desired and intended by many parents.

🏆 “I have lived experience and professional experience of the politics of formula supplementation.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A6 Milk banking – formal and informal
V. 12 Cultural competency
VII. C5 WHO code – advocacy and policy
VII. E2 Advocate for compliance with World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes (WHO Code)

Hold On For One More Day: Case Coordination for Lactation Private Practice

🎉 Bonus! 10 strategies to set healthy boundaries with your clients

1.5 CERPs + 1.5 CEUs

Instructor: Annie Frisbie MA, IBCLC

Abstract: Working with families on feeding challenges takes time, but many lactation consultants are unsure how to juggle what the client needs with their own boundaries and time constraints. This session will provide an overview of the steps involved in managing the client relationship from the moment of first contact through the conclusion of the clinical relationship. Emphasis will be placed on client-centered care, compassionate communication, thorough documentation, and effective protocols creating sustainable policies that support client self-efficacy and prevent provider burnout.

🏆 “Every family I work with has their own story, and care plans and follow ups can show families that they are the main characters in a journey only they can tell.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
VII. B. 3 Care plan development and sharing
VII. B. 4 Documentation
VII. C. 3 Code of Professional Conduct (CPC)

Human Rights and Human Milk

🎉 Bonus! How to Determine When Your Client Might Benefit from a Referral to Legal Services

1 E-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Indra Wood Lusero, Esq. and Jacqueline Kaye Hammack, Esq.

Abstract: Empowering health care providers, including lactation professionals, with the confidence and courage to be human rights defenders is a critical step in protecting the human rights of all people, and the human rights related to human milk. This presentation will explain the context of human rights and how violations are understood in U.S. law and internationally. Topics impacting lactation will include employment accommodations, COVID isolation, incarceration and custody disputes. Participants will be able to recognize relevant human rights documents and principles, see themselves as human rights defenders, and gain familiarity with accountability tools and strategies.

🏆 “The opportunity to give parents the information and support they need to make truly informed choices about both their baby’s health & well-being and their own. The ability to use and demonstrate the concepts of harm reduction, trauma-informed, culturally informed, and inclusive care is truly a joy and an honor.” – Indra Wood Lusero

🏆 “Ever since I was in law school I’ve been outraged that lactation isn’t protected better by the law, which has inspired me to protect and advance the rights of lactating dyads.” – Jacqueline Kaye Hammack

IBLCE Content Outline:
V. 12 – Cultural competency
VII. E3 – Advocate for mother/baby in healthcare system

I Like Baby Guts…and I Cannot Lie: Effects on Gut Microbiome When Supplementing

🎉 Bonus! 4 customizable social media posts about the infant gut

1 L-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Kristen Howorko, BSN, RN, IBCLC

Abstract: When a parent is not producing enough milk for their child, supplementation with donor human milk or infant formula is medically necessary to meet the infant’s nutritional needs for growth and development. Within the lactation profession, a narrative has become the norm that supplementation with donor human milk or infant formula has an intense impact on the infant’s microbiome and can lead to long term negative health outcomes. Current research suggests that this is not entirely the case. In this presentation, the Learner will gain evidence-based information on the infant gut microbiome and how raw human milk has the ability to protect the infant microbiome despite supplementation with formula or human donor milk. Additionally, the presentation will discuss two specific studies that break down the differences in microbial diversity in preterm infants and term infants with different feeding methods. By the end of the presentation, the Learner will be able to effectively communicate with clients/patients regarding topic of gut microbiome when supplementing.

🏆 “For the past 5 years I have worked in the NICU at a teaching hospital. Despite how hard our parents work to create a full milk supply, they often create a partial milk supply. It is important to convey the importance that every drop matters.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
1. A3 Infant anatomy and anatomical/oral challenges
VII. B2 Anticipatory guidance
VII. D1 Apply research in practice

Inclusive IBCLC Care Includes Formula (It’s Not Poison)

🎉 Bonus! Checklist for a Formula Feeding Consult

1 E-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Kate DiMarco Ruck, BA, IBCLC, CBS

Abstract: Inclusive IBCLC Care Includes Formula. For too long IBCLCs have had the reputation of “Lactivists” who advocate for breastfeeding and human lactation at all costs. What this attitude can cost is their reputation, clients, and access to any human milk. Artificial infant milk is a reality for many families we work with, and that choice should be treated with respect and not as a tragedy. Formula feeding families deserve to have access to skilled and compassionate infant feeding care, just as much as breast/chest/bodyfeeding families. IBCLCs need to actively listen to and understand the families they are working with, and work on their bias against anything that isn’t the feeding of human milk. It is imperative that IBCLCs realize that their explicit and implicit bias against having a solid knowledge base regarding infant formula can cause harm, especially to already oppressed communities. We can teach about artificial infant milk and the safe preparation of formula and still be WHO Code Compliant. We can help our clients feed their babies formula and still promote, support, and protect human lactation as the biological norm. It is our job as infant feeding experts to be able to guide our clients with information regarding choosing an appropriate formula, preparing that formula safely, and how to best feed it to their baby.

🏆 “As a former formula feeding parent, and an IBCLC who works with a population where the majority of my clients will go back to work in a few weeks after giving birth, I understand that formula is a reality for many families. I am concerned when my clients struggle to access evidence based information regarding formula from their healthcare professionals. I am disheartened when I hear other lactation professionals refuse to learn about formula because, “it’s all the same, anyway.” IBCLCs are infant feeding specialists and I believe it is a part of our job to help our clients make informed consent decisions regarding what they are going to be feeding their babies, and this includes information on artificial infant milk. Formula feeding parents deserve just as much care from a skilled professional as breast/chestfeeding parents. So do their babies. Knowledge is power, for ourselves as professionals, and for our clients as parents.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
VII. B5 – Educating mothers and families
VII. B6 – Educating professionals, peers, and students
VII. C3 – Code of professional conduct
VII. C5 – WHO code – advocacy and policy
VII. E2 – Advocate for compliance with World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breast milk Substitutes (WHO Code)

“Is your advice, like, totally 90’s?” Modern Considerations for HIV+ Clients in Lactation

🎉 Bonus! Handout for supporting families with HIV

1 L-CERP + 0.5 E-CERPs + 0.5 R-CERPs + 2 CEUs

Instructor: Bryna Hayden, IBCLC

Abstract: Many private practice care providers in the lactation field are out of date in their protocols and beliefs around HIV+ clients and the safety of their milk. There have been significant advances in the care and treatment of HIV in the United States since widespread public health messaging began to address HIV and perinatal populations, but outdated advice and provider bias still often prevails in the day-to-day experiences of HIV+ parents when accessing perinatal care. This lecture session will provide the most current evidence around HIV+ care for perinatal populations, and identify areas of implicit biases commonly encountered by patients. In this engaging update designed for the private practice lactation provider, learners will receive evidence-based information and tools with which to both address implicit biases they may hold and update their clinical protocols to provide high quality care for their HIV+ client populations.

🏆 “I would never say I’m the best person to speak on any topic! However, I am a good choice for a speaker because I am passionate about these topics, and have a significant amount of personal and professional experience of both. I am also directly engaged and a part of the communities that are most impacted by the topics being discussed.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
III. B4 – Maternal chronic disease
V. 12 – Cultural competency
VII. B2 – Anticipatory guidance
VII. B5 – Educating mothers and families

Lactation Loss- Grieving the Expected Experience and Dyadic Mental Health

🎉 Bonus! Identifying dysfunctional dyadic grief

1 R-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Kristin Cavuto MSW, LCSW, IBCLC

Abstract: When lactation doesn’t go as expected, new families can be left with unresolved emotional distress. This talk will help the perinatal professional to understand lactation grief in the context of culture and trauma history. It will educate on both functional expression of lactation loss and how to assess for perinatal mental illness during this crisis. It will introduce the concept of infant mental health and explore the infant response to parental lactation grief. Finally, it will teach the perinatal professional how to help the family through trauma informed and culturally humble counseling.

🏆 “My expertise in both lactation and mental health means that I speak both languages and can educate on their intersections.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A7 – Normal Infant Behaviors
V. 1 – Transition to Parenthood
V. 7 Maternal mental health
V. 8 – Maternal psychological/cognitive issues
V. 9 – Mother-baby relationship
V. 12 – Cultural competency
VII. B1 – Active listening
VII. B2 – Anticipatory guidnace
VII. B3 – Care plan development and sharing
VII. B5 – Educating mothers and families
VII. B8 – Emotional support
VII. B9 – Empowerment

The origin of love: Induction of lactation, co-nursing, and community human milk sharing

🎉 Bonus! Lactation Induction Protocol with Hormone Therapy

2 L-CERPs + 2 CEUs

Instructor: Bryna Hayden, IBCLC

Abstract: Clinical interaction with “non-traditional” methods of human milk production and sharing or feeding is limited to individual provider experience and information sharing of variable quality. Academic resources are often biased or incomplete. Due to various intersectionalities of identity and experience, many populations are left out of the conversation with no evidence-based resources for support or guidance.
Those who wish to induce lactation without gestation are frequently left to manage the process on their own, guided very loosely by protocols posted online that do not account for or clarify the risks of undergoing these methods— especially when their hormonal levels do not match the estrogen/progesterone profiles assumed by the authors.

This lecture will establish the real-world use of human milk sharing and cross-nursing in community settings in the United States, as well as clinical best practices for induction of lactation in non-gestating individuals. Evidence and guidance for these activities will be shared to further support communities who are desiring of clinical guidance and support.

🏆 “I’m a huge nerd. I take biology and science classes for fun. I would never say I’m the best person to speak on any topic! However, I am a good choice for a speaker because I am passionate about these topics, and have a significant amount of personal and professional experience of both. I am also directly engaged and a part of the communities that are most impacted by the topics being discussed.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A6 – Milk banking – formal and informal
II. 8 – Relactation
IV. 6 – Medication (prescriotion, over-the-counter, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures)
IV. 7 – Medicinal herbs
V. 5 – Family lifestyle

Respectful Care, Implicit Bias and the Maternal child Health Crisis

🎉 Bonus! Implicit Bias and Respectful Care handout

1 E-CERP + 1 CEU

Instructor: Dr. Nastassia Davis RN, DNP, IBCLC

Abstract: All families deserve respectful care. Implicit bias and delivery of respectful care are closely tied. Since implicit bias is a learned behavior, we can unlearn that behavior. We can bring awareness to bias by introducing the concept to student nurses. The Harvard implicit bias assessment is a great introductory tool to set the foundation for further learning and exploration of the various implicit biases. Student nurses must recognize that the inability to recognize issues such as pain and birth complications are the greatest contributors to preventable deaths in maternal morbidity and mortality. As part of this webinar, learners will be presented with real word experiences of how implicit bias shows up in clinical care and methods to transition towards cultural humility.

🏆 “I have been both a nursing student and now a faculty member.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
V. 12 – Cultural competency
VII. B1 – Active listening
VII. B8 – Emotional support

Sophisticated Supplementation: Managing Complex Cases (Panel)

🎉 Bonus! Interactive Workbook

1.5 L-CERPs + 1.5 CEUs

Instructor: Hope Lima PhD, RDN, IBCLC, Kristen Howorko, BSN, RN, IBCLC, and Christine Staricka BS, IBCLC, RLC, CE

Abstract: There are many scenarios where supplementation for infants is far more complex than choosing an affordable cow’s milk substitute. Situations may arise where an infant may need fortified human milk, be seeking donor human milk or shared human milk, or needs to locate an appropriate specialty formula due to infant medical needs. This round-table style session will be an open discussion about managing these complex supplementation cases.

🏆 “When I became an IBCLC in 2011, I didn’t realize how much time I would be spending supporting families with supplementing their babies. Deepening my skill set in this area has made me a better IBCLC and a better advocate for breastfeeding, chestfeeding, and human milk.” (Moderator, Annie Frisbie)

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A1. Feeding behaviours at different ages
I. A2. Food intolerances/allergies
I. A3 Infant anatomy and anatomical/oral challenges
I. A4. Introducing complementary foods
I. A8. Nutritional requirements – preterm
I. A9 – Preterm development and growth
VII. A2 – Handing and storage of human milk
VII. B2 Anticipatory guidance
VII. D1 Apply research in practice

Strengthening our Human Milk Fortifier Game

🎉 Bonus! The 5 Questions to Ask When Considering Fortifying Human Milk

1.5 L-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Christine Staricka BS, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA

Abstract: The practice of fortifying human milk has become muddled with various methodologies, some of which are not evidence-based and others unsafe. Lactation care providers often question the recommendation to fortify human milk due to questions of safety, research proving benefit, potential harms to infant, potential impacts to maternal/parental breastfeeding self-efficacy and confidence, and more. 

🏆 “With experience as an IBCLC both inside the NICU and in the community (post-discharge from the NICU), I see the impact that recommendations to “fortify” human milk has on the parent, family, and baby. I want to bring a clarity to this topic that I have never been able to find.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
TI. A8 – Nutritional requirements – preterm
I. A9 – Preterm development and growth
VII. A2 – Handing and storage of human milk

Supporting Second Time Families

🎉 Bonus! Fun ways to get your big kids involved with the feeding and care of your baby.

1 L-CERPs + 1 CEU

Instructor: Katy Linda IBCLC

Abstract: Feeding a baby is always a new adventure. Most parents assume that the second time will be easier than the first. Sometimes this isn’t the case. Parents who struggled with feeding their first child will assume the second time will be easier. There is also an assumption by care providers that parents don’t need support with subsequent children. This leaves many second (or more) time parents without the proper support to successfully feed their children. There are also extra challenges when the baby is not the only child in the home. Caring for a toddler while struggling to feed a newborn is can be a real challenge. In this presentation you will learn how to be prepared to support parents with subsequent children, you will learn strategies to help them make their feeding plan easier and workable for them, as well as ways to include the older children in the care of the newborn so that they also feel included.

🏆 “I love supporting families, and seeing their joy as they succeed with reaching their goals.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A1 – Feeding behaviors at different ages
V. 1 – Transition to parenthood
V. 5 – Family lifestyle
V. 6 – Identifying support networks
V. 9 – Mother-baby relationship

Teaming up with SLPs to improve infant sucking and swallowing skills

🎉 Bonus! Infant Swallow Screening Checklist

2 L-CERPs + 2 CEUs

Instructor: Stephanie Tolley, M.S., CCC-SLP, CLC

Abstract: Lactation professionals are often one of the first involved in providing infant feeding support and have the responsibility of early detection and management of infant feeding problems. This includes addressing problems with infant sucking skills and screening for swallowing concerns or other medical comorbidities that may necessitate referrals such as to a Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP). This course will provide evidence-based information on oral dysfunction and differentiate possible signs swallowing concerns to facilitate appropriate referrals as needed. Strategies to improve sucking and promote safe swallowing will also be discussed. Case studies demonstrating different scenarios where SLP and IBCLC may collaborate will be presented.

🏆 “I view interprofesssional collaboration as essential to support infant oral function and swallowing safety in breastfeeding/chestfeeding dyads with complex feeding needs and regularly coordinate care with lactation professionals in my community.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A3 – Infant anatomy and anatomical/oral challenges

To infinity and beyond! Pumping past a year

🎉 Bonus! Map It Out: Supporting Extended Breastfeeding

1 L-CERP + 1 CEU

Instructor: Nichelle Clark, IBCLC

Abstract: Parents are able to sustain and prolong their breastfeeding journeys longer than ever with the use of the breast pump. Pump utilization for parents in the western world has skyrocketed in recent years and thus, have opened a variety of ways for parents to meet their breastfeeding goals. We’ll explore expressing milk via a breast pump past the World Health Organization one year recommendation. We will not only explore motivations, but tools and guidance to assist them in achieving normal term and extended breastfeeding goals.

🏆 “I exclusively pumped for 2.5 years.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I. A1 – Feeding behaviors at different ages
VII. A5 – Pumps

The WHO Code: Theory and Application

🎉 Bonus! WHO Code & Intellectual Property Checklist

1 E-CERP + 1 CEU

Instructor: Allison Porter, JD, CBS

Abstract: Understanding the WHO Code in the context of supporting families who not feeding 100% exclusively at the breast can feel daunting. This session aims to demystify the obligations of the private practice IBCLC to provide comprehensive care for all families in an ethical manner.

🏆 “As a licensed attorney, I can apply the rules of statutory construction to documents such as the WHO code and accurately pinpoint what language is mandatory vs what language is permissive/a strong suggestion.”

IBLCE Content Outline:
I.VII. C5 – WHO code – advocacy and policy
VII. E2 – Advocate for compliance with World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk substitutes (WHO Code)

Thank you Annie! You have so many great resources!

Julie Thompson, MOT, OTR/L, CLC

Enrollment closed

Meet The Instructors

Kristin Cavuto MSW, LCSW, IBCLC

Kristin Cavuto MSW, LCSW, IBCLC

Topic: Lactation Loss- Grieving the Expected Experience and Dyadic Mental Health


“I go to adult Harry Potter conferences”

Kristin (she/they) is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (since 2003) and IBCLC (since 2010) in private practice in central NJ, as well as a LLL Leader (since 2008).  Her practice specialties are low supply, maternal and infant mental health, and the intersection of ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender in the care of the new family.  She has spoken on various lactation and mental health topics at LC in PP, the Lehigh Valley Breastfeeding Association Conference, and for LLL of the Garden State, and is active in several online lactation communities.

She is the mother of two boys who nursed full term despite maternal IGT, and who are now 14 and 11. In her spare time, she attends adult Harry Potter conferences, where she speaks (and is writing a book on) sorting and parenting.  She is an anti racist and LGBT+ activist, and a Gryffindor.

Kristin has spoken for us on Mental Health First Aid, Low Supply, and Divorce and Custody.

I always learn so much from Kristin and appreciate how she challenge listeners to start with facing our biases on the topics she presents on.

Samantha Lavender IBCLC
Nichelle Clark, IBCLC
Nichelle Clark

Nichelle Clark, IBCLC

Topic: To infinity and beyond! Pumping past a year


“People think my dog is named ‘Dennis’ after ‘the Menace’, but it’s really Dennis from It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.”

Nichelle Clark (she/her) is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC), wife, and mother of two residing in Chesapeake, Virginia. She is the owner of SonShine & Rainbows Lactation Services. Born and raised in Upper Marlboro, MD, Nichelle joined the United States Navy in 2010 and served honorably for 7.5 years. In 2020, she founded Black Breastfeeding 365, an organization that seeks to bridge the gap between Black Parents and the Lactation Professionals who serve them. When she’s not spending time with her husband and their 2 children, she serves as a United States Lactation Consultant Association (USLCA) Advisory Board Member. In her spare time, she admins multiple online support groups for People of Color, providing breastfeeding support and lactation education to her community. As an exclusive pumping mom herself, Nichelle is a champion for breastfeeding parents to write their own rules and breastfeed their way.

Nichelle last spoke for us on “Pumping Is Breastfeeding.”

The speaker was passionate and well-informed on all things pumping.

Lauren Fisher. IBCLC
Rebecca Costello, MPH, IBCLC

Rebecca Costello, MPH, IBCLC

Topic: Turn Up the Volume: Managing Supplementation + Self Study


“I have won two iPads in two different breast-related prize drawings (one from a lingerie company, one at a breastfeeding conference).

Rebecca began her lactation journey with her undergraduate senior thesis evaluating a breastfeeding education program. After working as a doula and childbirth educator, she decided to pursue a Master’s in Public Health in Maternal and Child Health. There, she was also in the first class of the Mary Rose Tully Training Initiative, a Pathway 2 IBCLC training program.

After graduating, she first worked full time as an IBCLC in a large academic hospital. She then became the Director of Lactation Services at a busy freestanding birth center. After making the move to a new state, she went into private practice part-time, and expanded her focus on a longtime passion: providing education for IBCLCs, lactation trainees, and health care providers.

She also has special interests in research, support for the LGBTQ+ community, and coalition-building to advance and support IBCLC services.

Rebecca last spoke for us on “Charting a Course for Success.”

This class was educational but presented in a friendly and motivating way!

Rita Bixby, BSN RN IBCLC
Dr. Nastassia Davis RN, DNP, IBCLC
Nastassia K. Davis

Dr. Nastassia Davis RN, DNP, IBCLC

Topic: Respectful Care, Implicit Bias and the Maternal child Health Crisis


“I absolutely love riding my peloton”

Dr. Davis (she/her) is a registered nurse and International Board Certified Lactation Consult with over 16 years of experience. She has dedicated the last 3 years of her life to making an impact on Black infant and Maternal health in New Jersey.  She is an advocate and nurse researcher passionate about changing the narrative.

Dr. Davis last spoke for us on Establishing a Non Profit.

Excellent information, engaging, relatable.

Sharon Curtin-Bottomley IBCLC
Kate DiMarco Ruck, BA, IBCLC, CBS
Kate DiMarco Ruck

Kate DiMarco Ruck, BA, IBCLC, CBS

Topic: Inclusive IBCLC Care Includes Formula (It’s Not Poison)


“My parents dropped me off at a summer theatre program in Philadelphia my junior year of high school. Two days later I took a bus to NYC, 5 years after that, I moved to Manhattan. It wasn’t until I’d lived in NYC for 20 years that I mentioned that first bus trip to my parents…”

Kate DiMarco Ruck, BA, IBCLC, CBS (she/her) is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and Certified Breastfeeding Specialist providing private practice breast/chest/bodyfeeding support to families in the New York City Metro Area.

Kate is a compassionate and knowledgeable IBCLC trained in the Oral Habilitation of the Breastfeeding Dyad, and Rhythmic Movement and Reflexes in the Infant. While she works with families experiencing a variety of lactation issues, Kate specializes in working with dyads who have Low Milk Supply, Tethered Oral Tissues, and Breastfeeding after Reduction (BFAR).

She is an active participant in the local, national and international lactation community. Kate was a 2020 Speaker at LCinPP Workshop, a guest speaker for Lactation Learning Collective, and an instructor for the Lactation Private Practice Essential Course. Kate has been featured talking about lactation and infant feeding in articles in The Huffington Post, Romper, NY Magazine, and Inside Edition.

Kate currently serves on the board of New York Lactation Consultants Association as Education/Events Director. Kate enjoys collaborating with her colleagues through brainstorming on client situations, speaking together at conferences, and organizing events for professional development. Kate is continually attending professional conferences and trainings to keep up with the evolving field of human lactation in order to provide the best possible care for her clients.

Kate is founder of The Parenting Studio- a community space in Brooklyn, NY. Kate holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatre from Baldwin Wallace University. Kate has visited all 7 continents on earth, but calls Brooklyn, NY home, with her husband Ken, her two formerly breastfed children, Orion (14) and Josie (11), and our 2 dogs, Boomer and Tracker.

Kate last spoke for us on The Art of the Report and Maintaning Referrals.

I really appreciated the friendly tone of this webinar, information was provided in a concise and clear manner while maintaining personality and held my interest. Thank you!

Anne Raley IBCLC
Annie Frisbie MA, IBCLC

Annie Frisbie MA, IBCLC

Topic: Hold On For One More Day: Case Coordination for Lactation Private Practice


“I learned to ski when I was 5 and got very good at it. I liked the moguls the best”

Annie Frisbie MA, IBCLC has been a lactation consultant in private practice in New York City since 2011. She is also the creator of the Lactation Private Practice Essential Toolkit and the accompanying Lactation Private Practice Essential Course, and is the co-host of the Lactation Business Coaching Podcast. In 2018 Annie was honored with the US Lactation Consultant Association’s President’s Award, “awarding those that demonstrate extraordinary service to the association and profession.” 

Annie has a BA from Franklin and Marshall College with a double major in American Studies & Theatre, Dance, and Film, and an MA in Cinema Studies from New York University. She lives in Queens, New York with her husband, their two children, and their two cats.

Annie was great! I can easily get distracted and my mind often wanders, but she kept my attention and gave great examples of issues that I may run into in the future.

Kiara Carnes, BSN, RN, IBCLC
Jacqueline Kaye Hammack
Jacqueline Hammack

Jacqueline Kaye Hammack

Topic: Human Rights and Human Milk


“Of my two babies, neither was born at term: the first was early and the second was late..”

Jacqueline Hammack (she/her) is an innovator working at the intersection of perinatal care and the legal system to advance reproductive justice. By bridging her work as an attorney with her passion as a doula, Jacqueline strives to remove the barriers that pregnant and birthing people face accessing evidence-based, respectful perinatal care and holistic postpartum support. Jacqueline’s advocacy protects and promotes the civil and human rights of perinatal dyads in pregnancy, birth, lactation, and throughout the fourth trimester.

Jacqueline serves on the board of the Birth Rights Bar Association, the North American Registry of Midwives, and Better Birth Mississippi. She is a Collaborator with the Black Mamas Matter Alliance and a La Leche League Leader. She was a Class 2 fellow with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Community Leadership Network with the Center for Creative Leadership®, an inaugural fellow of the Mississippi Women’s Policy Institute, and a member of The Mississippi Bar’s Leadership Forum Class of 2020.

Jacqueline is a Madriella trained doula and a graduate of Tulane University Law School, Jackson State University, and Holmes Community College. She lives in Hattiesburg and works throughout Mississippi and Louisiana.

This is Jacqueline’s first time speaking for us.

Kristen Howorko, BSN, RN, IBCLC
Kristen Howorko

Kristen Howorko, BSN, RN, IBCLC

Topic:  I Like Baby Guts…and I Cannot Lie: Effects on Gut Microbiome When Supplementing


“In 1998, as recent graduates from The University of Texas, my best friend and I wanted to move out of state for one year. We flipped a coin between Colorado and California. Colorado won, and I have now lived here for 23 years.”

I am a Board Certified Lactation Consultant and Registered Nurse. I worked in a Level III NICU as an RN on a 50 bed unit at the University of Colorado Hospital, and have worked as a Lactation Consultant in the same NICU for the past 3 years. In February of 2020, I started Milk’d Up, which is a family-centered lactation practice that strives to empower parents to feel confident feeding their babies. We are an inclusive practice that supports ALL infant feeding goals. When I am not helping moms, I like to spend time reading, running, skiing or doing yoga.

This is Kristen first time speaking for us.

Bryna Hayden, IBCLC

Bryna Hayden, IBCLC

Topic:  The origin of love: Induction of lactation, co-nursing, and community human milk sharing and “Is your advice, like, totally 90’s?” Modern Considerations for HIV+ Clients in Lactation


“I’m a huge nerd. I take biology and science classes for fun.”

Bryna is an IBCLC (Internationally Board-certified Lactation Consultant), adult educator, birth doula, mentor IBCLC, and private practice owner. Bryna has also sought additional training and continuing education in the areas of oral function and infant feeding, Rhythmic Movement Training (RMT), primitive reflexes and brain development in infants, cultural congruency, trauma-informed care, harm-reduction approaches to clinical care, and other counseling strategies for client-facing care.

A member of the 2SLGBTQIA+ and neurodivergent communities, Bryna recognizes the concepts of inclusivity and accessibility as foundational on every level of lactation from education to clinical practice and back again. Bryna also recognizes that their background as a white person in the United States places them in a position of privilege, and they are always cognizant of how that lens impacts their work both in education and clinical practice.

When not working, learning, or teaching, Bryna can be found staring up at huge trees in awe or inhaling the salty air at the coast in the Pacific Northwest where they live with their children, partner, and dogs.

Bryna has spoken for us on Trans Parenting, Informed Consent, Neurodiversity, and Recreational Drug Use.

Bryna is an outstanding speaker. She is so knowledgeable and delivers so much information without making the learner feel overwhelmed. I loved her first presentation, and this one even more!

Annmarie Hext, IBCLC
Susan Howard MSN, RN, IBCLC

Susan Howard MSN, RN, IBCLC

Topic: Bottle Skills for the IBCLC- A Fresh Perspective


“I once found $5K at a hardware store. I turned it into the police; it was never claimed and I received the money back after an investigation was launched. That was the seed money that launched my lactation career.“

Susan is a Registered Nurse and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. Her background is public health. She has been a supporter and champion of maternal infant health for 26 years. Nursing was a second career. Susan has worked as a Labor and Delivery nurse, childbirth educator, and clinical research nurse.

Susan is the owner of Arlington Lactation & Feeding Therapy, located near Washington DC. She offers comprehensive virtual lactation support and education to families. Susan is an expert in complex feeding issues including tongue ties and bottle refusal. Susan describes herself as a “lactogeek” and loves talking about babies, boobs, bottles and breastmilk.

Susan last spoke for us on “Ask Me Anything: Bottle Consults.”

This bottle consults talk was simply amazing. Learned so many new tricks and have a plethora of new tools to try!

Natalie Worthington IBCLC
Dr. Christine L. Kan, OTD, OTR/L, IBCLC
Christine Lam Kan

Dr. Christine L. Kan, OTD, OTR/L, IBCLC

Topic:  Addressing underlying infant developmental milestones to improve milk transfer


“My favorite ice cream is banana ice cream mixed with graham crackers at cold stone”

Dr. Christine L. Kan, OTD, OTR/L, IBCLC (she/her) is an occupational therapist that specializes in lactation, feeding therapy, orofacial sensory motor re-training, and lip and tongue ties. She graduated from the University of Southern California with a doctorate in occupational therapy in 2013, focusing on feeding interventions for children with special needs. She is trained in Beckman Oral Motor Protocol, Infant and Pediatric Neurodevelopmental training (NDT), Neonatal Oral Motor and Assessment Scale (NOMAS ), Neonatal Touch and Massage Certification (NTMC), and has her advanced practice in feeding, eating, and swallowing (SWC). She has experience helping medically fragile infants and young children transition from gastronomy tube (G-tube) feedings to oral feedings at the hospital and at home.

Dr. Kan currently works part time as a neonatal occupational therapist in the NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) at San Gabriel Valley Medical Center in San Gabriel, CA and Valley Presbyterian Hospital in Van Nuys, CA. She also works part time at her private practice, supporting parents with complex feeding histories, infant development, and breastfeeding. She is an international board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) and is passionate about supporting parents of premature and babies with tethered oral tissues breast/chestfeed their newborn. She went through her own personal struggle of breastfeeding babies with ties; her daughter with a lip tie and her son with a lip and tongue tie. Christine is currently tandem nursing her toddler (3 years) and infant (1 year). 

This is Dr. Kan’s first time speaking for us.

Sekeita Lewis-Johnson, DNP FNP-BC IBCLC 
Sekeita Lewis-Johnson

Sekeita Lewis-Johnson, DNP FNP-BC IBCLC 

Topic:  The Elephant Often Ignored: Bias & Politics of Artificial Infant Supplementation


“I love to skate backwards on roller skates.”

Dr. Sekeita Lewis-Johnson (she/her) is a Board-Certified Family Nurse Practitioner, International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and Birth Doula. She is the Accredited Provider Program Director and an Instructor for Lactation Education Resources.

She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in nursing in December 1997 from Michigan State University. From there she went to live in Washington D.C. where she participated in a maternal-child fellowship program geared towards new graduates entering specialties. For the past 23 years, her primary focus has been labor and delivery and maternal-child nursing. She has experience as a Nursing Instructor teaching at various hospitals in the Metro-Detroit area. On May 2, 2019, Dr. Lewis-Johnson graduated from Wayne State University where she earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree and Nursing Education Certificate.

She is one of the Founding Members of Southeast Michigan IBCLCs of Color and Mama’s Mobile Milk. She is owner of Mommy and Me Lactation Consulting, LLC, and serves as a Board Director for The United States Breastfeeding Committee. She sits on The Maternal Infant Health, Health Equity Action Committee for the State of Michigan, and is a member of The Michigan Milk Collective. She serves her community by volunteering on the Beloved Community Initiative Leadership Team in Farmington Hills, Michigan and Birth Detroit which is the first free-standing birth center in Detroit. 

Dr. Lewis-Johnson has received multiple awards during her career. Upon graduating from MSU’s College of Nursing, she was the recipient of the “Outstanding Undergraduate Nursing Award”. This year she is the recipient of two awards: “The Award of Excellence” from the United States Lactation Consultant Association and “The Alumni Service Award” from The College of Nursing at Michigan State University. She is a national speaker with an international audience. She also provides health equity training to local municipalities per request.  

Dr. Lewis-Johnson is an avid advocate for equitable and just policies and practices especially related to black maternal-child health disparities. Passionate about maternal-child health and breastfeeding, she provides lactation and doula services within Metro-Detroit and surrounding areas. Her main goals are to prevent obstetrical harm, and to assist families to achieve their desired feeding goals. She believes that breastfeeding self-efficacy, along with skilled and timely lactation support are key to breastfeeding success. Dr. Lewis-Johnson is married to a Spartan and she is a proud mother of 3 children, one of which who graduated from MSU’s College of Social Work in May of 2021.

This is Dr. Lewis-Johnson’s first time speaking for us.

Hope Lima PhD, RDN, IBCLC
Hope Lima

Hope Lima PhD, RDN, IBCLC

Topic:  Bon appe-teat! Strategies for managing nutrition during the first year of life + Self Study


“I swam competitively for 18 years, finishing my career swimming 4 years at a DII college in West Virginia”

Hope (she/her) became an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in 2017, completed her PhD in nutritional biochemistry in May 2018, and became a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) in September 2020. In addition to owning and operating Hope Feeds Babies, Hope is employed full time at Winthrop University in the Department of Human Nutrition overseeing the Certificate in Medical Lactation and running a research lab that focuses on helping mothers to reach their infant feeding goals, improving access to human milk, and analyzing the nutritional content of human milk.

Dr. Lima last spoke for us on Interpreting Growth Charts in a Pediatric Population.

Hope was very knowledgable and informative! Very easy to follow.

Julie Tower RN, BSN, IBCLC
Katy Linda IBCLC
Katy Linda

Katy Linda IBCLC

Topic:  Supporting Second Time Families


“I’m so boring. I had a baby in the car? I met my husband on the internet in the 90’s? Seriously I’m boring. ”

Katy Linda, IBCLC (she/her) is a Private Practice IBCLC in Central Maryland. With nearly 15 years of supporting breastfeeding families under her belt, she has a passion for normalizing breastfeeding and supporting parents in their journey. With a special interest in complex feeding situations, Katy has sought out extra training in a variety of modalities. Katy teaches classes for new and expectant parents, facilitates regular support groups, and provides personalized infant feeding support including prenatal education, breastfeeding/chestfeeding struggles, pumping and returning to work. She also teaches the next generation of IBCLCs with an active internship program.

Katy last spoke for us on Ethical Retail.

Katy brought up a lot of really great points when considering bringing retail into your practice.

Jessi Sletten, CLC, PMH-C
Indra Wood Lusero, Esq.
Indra Lusero

Indra Wood Lusero, Esq.

Topic:  Human Rights and Human Milk


“We are not experts on elephants.”

Indra Wood Lusero, Esq., (Director, President, they/them) is a Staff Attorney with National Advocates for Pregnant Women and Founder of Elephant Circle, a Colorado-based birth justice organization. Indra’s publications include “Challenging Hospital VBAC Bans Through Tort Liability” and “Making the Midwife Impossible: How the Structure of Maternity Care Harms the Practice of Home Birth Midwifery.” Indra went to law school after attending a MANA conference in 2005 where folks lamented not having a “hotshot team of lawyers” who could help defend midwives. Indra has endeavored to develop just such a team.

This is Indra’s first time speaking for us.

Allison Porter, JD, CBS


Allison Porter, JD, CBS
Topic: The WHO Code: Theory and Application

“I am licensed to practice law in NJ and only lived there for 3 months.”
Allison Porter is an Attorney and Certified Breastfeeding Specialist who breastfed her son for 18 months and daughter until age 2. She’s a TN girl born and raised in Memphis, TN, went to the University of TN Knoxville for undergraduate school, went to law school in Memphis, and currently lives in Nashville. She currently practices Health Law focusing on healthcare regulatory compliance and managed care insurance denials after doing Employment Discrimination law for several years. Her main lactation passion is to be a resource on breastfeeding and pumping rights laws and advocacy.

Allison last spoke for us on Ethical Private Practice.

Lourdes M. Santaballa Mora IBCLC

Lourdes M. Santaballa Mora MS IBCLC CLAAS IYCFS

Topic:  An Added Layer of Safety and Preserving Lactation: When Supplementation Happens During an Emergency


“I do an expert fake sneeze, possibly worthy of some type of Academy Award.”

Lourdes (ella/she/her) is a community activist and community organizer, having worked in the domestic violence, housing equity and reproductive rights/infant feeding movements. In lactation, she has worked as a volunteer peer counselor, IBCLC, mentor, researcher and trainer. She is the co-founder of Alimentación Segura Infantil, an organization focused on increasing breastfeeding, leadership and training in disenfranchised communities, with a focus on disaster preparedness, response and recovery.  Formed after Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017, ASI is currently the largest non-profit community-based infant and young child feeding organization in Puerto Rico. ASI is also an IBCLC Care Award recipient and a mentorship path for aspiring IBCLCs. Lourdes is active in the USBC, IFE (Infant Feeding in Emergencies) Core Group and USLCA Advisory Committee and has received various awards and recognition in the field for her activism and research. Amidst two category 5 hurricanes, earthquakes, and a global pandemic, she was able to finish her master’s degree in Clinical Nutrition and Integrative Health in 2020. You can listen to her weekly podcast in Spanish, Teta y Pecho: Lactancia Interseccional on all the major platforms.

This is Lourdes’s first time speaking for us.

Johanna Sargeant IBCLC
Johanna Sargeant

Johanna Sargeant, BA, BEd, IBCLC

Topic:  Care plans for Supplementing Families: How to use Motivational Interviewing to create feasible, sustainable plans and goals


“Switzerland accidentally became our home after needing a break from our year-long European cycling-and-camping adventure. If we had arrived on a day with bad weather, we would never have stayed! We planned on two weeks, then one months, then three months… and now it’s been eleven years, two children, one house and eventually our Swiss Citizenship!”

Johanna Sargeant (she/her) is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, teacher and writer based in Zurich, Switzerland. She is passionate about utilising her background in education, biological science, psychology and language to empower parents with empathetic support and evidence-based information through her private practice, Milk and Motherhood. Originally from Australia, Johanna provides much-needed English-speaking support to many thousands of parents throughout Switzerland and across Europe, and has recently been contracted to create the new education modules for the European Society of Paediactric Research and the European Society of Neonatology. Along with speaking at a variety of international conferences, she has taught at the University of Zurich, has spoken as a panelist for the WHO’s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative congress in Geneva, and has been an expert speaker and facilitator for Google. The complexities of her personal feeding experiences have led her to the establishment of the sole peer-to-peer milk-sharing network in Switzerland, and fuels her passion for providing knowledgeable, guilt-free infant feeding support globally.

This is Johanna’s first time speaking for us.

Christine Staricka BS, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA

Christine Staricka BS, IBCLC, RLC, FILCA

Topic:  Fortifiers


“I am a huge Pearl Jam fan”

Christine Staricka (she/her) is a Registered, International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant and trained childbirth educator. As the host of The Lactation Training Lab Podcast, her current role focuses on training and coaching current and aspiring lactation care providers.Christine created and developed The First 100 Hours© concept, an early lactation framework designed to support lactation care providers with the knowledge and mindset they need to help families optimize early lactation.Christine worked as a hospital-based IBCLC for 10 years and has over 21 years experience providing clinical lactation care and support. She provides clinical lactation care to families at Baby Café Bakersfield and serves as its Director.Christine recently completed 6 years of service on the Board of the United States Lactation Consultant Association (USLCA.)  She holds a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Phoenix.  She has been married for 28 years, lives in California, and is the proud mother of 3 amazing daughters.

Christine last spoke for us on recurring mastitis.

Christine provided great information that will be helpful to me as I assist families.

Danielle Blakney, LPN IBCLC
Stephanie Tolley, M.S., CCC-SLP, CLC

Stephanie Tolley, M.S., CCC-SLP, CLC

Topic: Teaming up with SLPs to improve infant sucking and swallowing skills


“I’m teaching my dog to use talking buttons. Her vocabulary is around 12 words now that she uses regularly. “Dogbar” is her favorite request.“

Stork to Fork was founded by Stephanie Tolley, M.S., CCC-SLP (she/her) to provide support to families of infants and children experiencing unique feeding challenges in their home environment. Stephanie is North and South Carolina licensed and ASHA certified Speech-Language Pathologist. She has been providing feeding, swallowing, and communication therapy to families in the Charlotte area since 2011 and has practiced in outpatient hospital, home-health, daycare, private practice, and school settings. She is specialized in oral function, feeding, and swallowing problems from infancy through adolescence. Stephanie utilizes a family-centered and responsive approach with emphasis on parent/caregiver coaching, education, and training. A family’s feeding journey is often multifaceted and may require collaboration with a team of professionals. Stephanie views direct communication between members of this team as essential to the treatment process and reducing burden on the family. When Stephanie is not helping families, she enjoys getting outside with her husband, Robert, and #darladog for hiking, yoga (yes, Darla does yoga too), or exploring the city. 

This is Stephanie’s first time speaking for us.

Paperless Lactation continues to be THE person to learn from when it comes to IBCLC in PP! Thank you!

Erica Diehl, IBCLC

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Clinical Complexities in Supplementing Babies

Because fed is just the beginning.

32 CERPs + CEUs

All recordings available through 4/30/23

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